Blake MooreBlake Moore

Current Position: US Representative for UT-01 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Video:
Blake Moore | 2020 Free Speech Messages

 

 

News

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for UT-01 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Video:
Blake Moore | 2020 Free Speech Messages

 

 

About

Blake Moore 1

Source: Government page

Blake Moore is a proactive problem solver from Ogden committed to representing each and every constituent of Utah’s First District. He is dedicated to reflecting Utah’s values in Congress and finding solutions to the challenges facing the district and the state. Advocating for inclusive, pro-growth, and aspirational principles, Blake is amplifying Northern Utah’s voice on a national level to ensure Utahns receive the service and representation they deserve.

Before being elected to Congress, Blake worked for small businesses and in the foreign service, experiences that now guide his work on domestic and foreign policy. As a Principal at Cicero Group, Blake worked primarily in the social impact, marketing research, and strategy practice areas leading projects and serving clients throughout Utah and the nation. He has expertise in education, financial services, public policy, healthcare, transportation, supply chain, and waste industries, and this work informs his customer service and problem solver approach in Washington, D.C., as he identifies ways to help the federal government better work for Northern Utah. His passion for helping organizations manage the change process drives his ambition to overcome partisan gridlock, improve federal agencies, and smartly streamline the nation’s bureaucracy.

Previously, Blake worked abroad in business development in the healthcare and financial services industries, which led him to understand the challenges that small businesses grapple with on a daily basis. Blake was also honored to serve in the Foreign Service for the U.S. Department of State, where he gained first-hand knowledge of the international threats that America faces. This experience taught him to take seriously the United States’ diplomatic apparatus, the readiness of the Armed Forces, and the nation’s commitment to strengthening partnerships and alliances across the globe.

Blake is a proud product of the First District, and he knows that this community is defined by family, service, and doing the right thing—even when it’s hard. Born and raised in Ogden, Blake learned hard work and responsibility from his dad and optimism and service from his mom. The Ogden community’s tremendous teachers, coaches, families, and mentors inspired Blake and taught him the privilege of leadership and the power of giving back.

Blake obtained a Master’s in Public Policy and Administration from Northwestern University. He graduated from the University of Utah after serving a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Seoul, South Korea, and signing a scholarship to play as the quarterback at Utah State University. In high school, he was awarded the Wendy’s National High School Heisman, an award honoring one male and one female senior for excellence in athletics, academics, and citizenship. He remembers fondly a conversation with a Heisman trustee after the ceremony. The trustee mentioned that it was Blake’s Eagle Scout and other service projects that set him apart. Blake recalls thinking at that moment, “I’m not special; that’s just the way kids are raised in Northern Utah!”

Blake is married to Jane Boyer, his amazing, humorous, and very candid wife, who encourages him to take risks and pursue big things. Blake and Jane have three awesome and active boys who keep them on their toes, Max, George, and Winston. Even after being sworn in, Blake’s most prized title is “Little League Coach.”

Committees  

House Committee on Armed Services

House Committee on Natural Resources

Caucuses  

Adoption Caucus

Alzheimers Task Force

Arts Caucus

Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus

Congressional Future Caucus

Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus

Direct Selling Caucus

F-35 Caucus

Global Investment in America Caucus

Humanities Caucus

Hypersonics Caucus

Job Corps Caucus

Military Depot and Industrial Facilities Caucus

National Guard Caucus

Navy & Marine Corps Caucus

Problem Solvers Caucus

Western Caucus

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

1320 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-0453
Fax: (202) 225-5857
324 25th Street

Ogden, UT  84401

Phone: (801) 625-0107
Fax: (385) 405-2155

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Wikipedia

Twitter

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

Blake David Moore (born June 22, 1980)[1] is an American politician and former diplomat from the state of Utah. He is the U.S. Representative for Utah’s 1st congressional district.

Early life and education

Moore was born and raised in Ogden, Utah. He attended Ogden High School, graduating in 1998.[2][3] During high school, he was a quarterback for the football team.[4] In 1997, he won the Wendy’s High School Heisman.[5] He is an Eagle Scout.[6]

After graduating from high school, Moore enrolled at Utah State University on a football scholarship.[7] His freshman year roommate was American-born Azerbaijani NBA player Spencer Nelson. During his freshman year, Moore’s football scholarship was rescinded by a newly installed football coach after he left to serve as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Seoul, South Korea.[8]

After returning from his mission, Moore transferred to the University of Utah, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in behavioral science and business. He earned a Master of Science degree in public policy and administration from Northwestern University.[9][10]

Career

Moore served as a United States Foreign Service officer in the United States Department of State, and worked as a principal for the Cicero Group, a management consulting firm based in Salt Lake City.[11]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2020

In February 2020, Moore declared his candidacy for Utah’s 1st congressional district in the 2020 elections.[11] In a field of 12 primary candidates, Moore advanced out of the Republican nominating convention in second place, together with Weber County Commissioner Kerry Gibson. Two other candidates, Davis County commissioner Bob Stevenson and Kaysville mayor Katie Witt, also secured their spot in the primary by gathering signatures. During the party nominating process, Moore was criticized for not living within the congressional district.[12] At the time, he resided on the east bench of Salt Lake City, 15 miles outside the district. Congressional candidates are not required to live inside the district they represent, only in the same state. Moore then won the four-way June 30 Republican primary with just over 30% of the vote.[13]

In the general election, Moore defeated Democratic nominee Darren Parry with 69.5% of the vote to Parry’s 30.4%.[14] He took office on January 3, 2021, marking the first time an incumbent had not run in 18 years and maintaining Republican control of the district since 1980.[15][16] Moore has said that despite being elected to one of the most powerful political bodies in the world, the title he most prizes is “Little League coach”.[17]

Tenure

On May 19, 2021, Moore was one of 35 Republicans who joined all Democrats in voting to approve legislation to establish the January 6, 2021 commission meant to investigate the storming of the U.S. Capitol.[18]

Moore was among the few House Republicans who voted to keep Liz Cheney as conference chair both times a vote was held.[19]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Violation of STOCK Act

Moore failed to disclose $1.1 million in stock trades as required by law and has acknowledged paying a $200 fine to the House Committee on Ethics.[24]

Personal life

Moore and his wife, Jane Boyer, have three sons.[25][26] In October 2020, Moore, Jane, and their three children all tested positive for COVID-19, though none were hospitalized with the illness.[27]

References

  1. ^ Bautista, Lillian (November 30, 2020). “Rep.-elect Blake Moore (R-Utah-01)”. The Hill. Retrieved December 1, 2020.
  2. ^ Standard-Examiner, TIM VANDENACK. “Ogden native, former U.S. foreign service officer launches U.S. House bid”. Standard-Examiner. Retrieved July 23, 2020.
  3. ^ “Blake Moore – General”. National Football Foundation. Retrieved July 23, 2020.
  4. ^ “Ogden quarterback is so much Moore than a good football player – Deseret News”. Deseret.com. November 4, 1997. Retrieved July 5, 2020.
  5. ^ “House hopeful Blake Moore puts focus on foreign service, work with Utah’s economy | Government”. standard.net. June 16, 2020. Retrieved July 5, 2020.
  6. ^ “Ogden’s Blake Moore named national winner of High School Heisman – Deseret News”. Deseret.com. December 13, 1997. Retrieved July 23, 2020.
  7. ^ “Another Utah congressional candidate runs in a district where he does not live”. The Salt Lake Tribune.
  8. ^ “How Utahn Blake Moore went from a political unknown to GOP nominee for Congress”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved July 23, 2020.
  9. ^ “Blake Moore”. Cicero Group. Retrieved July 23, 2020.
  10. ^ KUTV (June 16, 2020). “Blake Moore – 1st Congressional District candidate”. KUTV. Retrieved July 23, 2020.
  11. ^ a b “Ogden native, former U.S. foreign service officer launches U.S. House bid | Government”. standard.net. June 16, 2020. Retrieved July 5, 2020.
  12. ^ /news/politics/2020/06/15/utahs-st-district/ “Utah’s 1st District Republican primary features plenty of controversy” Check |url= value (help). The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  13. ^ “Blake Moore wins Utah’s tight 1st Congressional District GOP race”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved July 23, 2020.
  14. ^ “Utah House Results”. CNN. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  15. ^ “AP: Blake Moore wins Utah’s 1st Congressional District”. KSLNewsRadio. November 4, 2020. Retrieved November 4, 2020.
  16. ^ “Blake Moore will be a new Utah face in Congress as Reps. Chris Stewart, John Curtis also win big”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved November 4, 2020.
  17. ^ “Meet Representative Blake Moore”. U.S. Congressman Blake Moore. January 3, 2021. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  18. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (May 19, 2021). “Here are the 35 House Republicans who voted for the January 6 commission”. CNN. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  19. ^ https://www.deseret.com/opinion/2021/5/24/22451875/jan-6-attack-capitol-commision-utah-blake-moore-liz-cheney-deseret-news-editorial-board
  20. ^ “Congressman Blake Moore Selected to Serve on the House Armed Services Committee | Representative Blake Moore”. blakemoore.house.gov. January 25, 2021. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  21. ^ “Congressman Blake Moore Selected to Serve on the House Committee on Natural Resources | Representative Blake Moore”. blakemoore.house.gov. January 25, 2021. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  22. ^ “MEMBERS”. RMSP. Retrieved March 1, 2021.
  23. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Archived from the original on January 1, 2019. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  24. ^ “This Utah congressman paid a fine for violating rule on stock sales”.
  25. ^ “Meet Blake”. Elect Blake Moore for Congress. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  26. ^ Oglesby, Jon. “Former High School Heisman winner giving back”. Standard-Examiner. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  27. ^ “1st District candidate Blake Moore tests positive for COVID-19”. Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved November 8, 2020.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Rob Bishop
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Utah’s 1st congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Barry Moore
United States representatives by seniority
413th
Succeeded by
Frank J. Mrvan


Issues

ECONOMY

Read relevant news, information and initiatives regarding the Economy.

EDUCATION

Learn about initiatives and news items related to Education.

ENERGY

Read relevant news, information and initiatives regarding Energy.

HEALTH

Learn about news and information related to Health.

NATIONAL SECURITY

Learn about news and information related to National Security.


VETERANS

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X
Chris StewartChris Stewart

Current Position: US Representative for UT-02 since 2013
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Video:
Rep. Chris Stewart’s full questioning of Vindman and Williams | Trump’s first impeachment

News

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for UT-02 since 2013
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Video:
Rep. Chris Stewart’s full questioning of Vindman and Williams | Trump’s first impeachment

About

Chris Stewart 1

Source: Government page

Chris Stewart is the Congressman from Utah’s Second Congressional District. He is a multiple New York Times best-selling and national award-winning author, world-record-setting Air Force pilot, and the former owner and CEO of a small business.

Chris is one of ten children and grew up on a dairy farm in Cache Valley. He graduated from Utah State University, where he earned his degree in economics. Upon graduation, Chris joined the United States Air Force where he was the Distinguished Graduate (top of his class) in both Officer Training School and Undergraduate Pilot Training. He served for fourteen years as a pilot in the Air Force, flying both rescue helicopters and the B-1B bomber. He holds three world speed records, including the world’s record for the fastest non-stop flight around the world.

Chris has also written 17 books, several of which have become national best-sellers and have been published in six different countries.

Before being elected to Congress, Chris served as president and CEO of the Shipley Group, a nationally recognized firm for consulting expertise in energy and the environment. He and his wife, Evie, are the parents of six children.

Committee Assignments

House Appropriations Committee

  • Subcommittees:
    • Financial Services and General Government
    • Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies

House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence

  • Subcommittees:
    • Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation
    • Strategic Technologies and Advanced Research

Caucus Memberships

Conservative Climate Caucus

Anti-Socialism Caucus, Chairman

Republican Study Committee

Congressional Western Caucus

Border Security Caucus

Federal Land Action Group

Career and Technical Education Caucus

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Caucus, Co-chair

Congressional Kurdish-American Caucus

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

Washington, DC Office
166 Cannon House Office Building
Washington DC, 20515
Phone: 202-225-9730
District Offices

Bountiful City District Office
585 West 500 South #230
Bountiful, UT 84010
Phone: 801-364-5550

St. George District Office
253 West St. George Boulevard
Suite 100
St. George, UT 84770
Phone:435-627-1500

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Twitter

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

Christopher Douglas Stewart (born July 15, 1960)[1] is an American politician, author and businessman serving as the U.S. Representative for Utah’s 2nd congressional district since 2013. A member of the Republican Party, he is known for his bestsellers Seven Miracles That Saved America and The Miracle of Freedom: Seven Tipping Points That Saved the World, as well as his series The Great and Terrible.

Stewart graduated from Utah State University in 1984 before joining the United States Air Force. Later, he began writing novels and became president and CEO of the Shipley Group. He is a defender of former President Donald Trump. In 2020, Stewart won a fifth term in the House of Representatives, defeating Democratic nominee Kael Weston.

Early life and education

Stewart was born in Logan, Utah, and grew up on a dairy farm in Cache Valley. His father was a retired Air Force pilot and teacher. His mother, Sybil S. Stewart, was a full-time homemaker and was recognized as the Utah Mother of the Year in 1996.[2]

Stewart graduated from Sky View High School in 1978 and entered Utah State University that year. After a year in college, he served as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Texas. After his church service, Stewart reentered Utah State, and in 1984 earned a degree in economics from its College of Business.

Military service

Stewart served in the Air Force for 14 years, initially flying rescue helicopters and then transitioning to fixed-wing jets and flying the B-1B bomber. He was stationed at Dyess Air Force Base, Mountain Home Air Force Base, and other Air Force bases.

After college, Stewart was accepted into the Air Force’s Officer Training School, followed by assignment to Undergraduate Pilot Training, graduating at the top of his class in both instances. Stewart flew both helicopters and jet aircraft in the military.[3]

In 1995, Stewart was awarded the Mackay Trophy for “significant aerial achievement” for the combat capability operation known as Coronet Bat. On June 3, 1995, Stewart and a flight of two B-1s set the world record for the fastest nonstop flight around the world. He was the mission’s senior project officer. The mission’s purpose was to demonstrate the B-1 Lancer‘s capability with live bombing activity over three bombing ranges on three continents in two hemispheres.[4] In the process, the team set three world records, flying 36,797.65 kilometers in 36 hours and 13 minutes.[5] The mission was recounted in the book Supersonic Saints: Thrilling Stories from LDS Pilots.[citation needed]

Private sector career

Business career

After his military career, Stewart entered the private sector. He was president and CEO of the Shipley Group, a consulting company that specializes in energy and environmental issues.[6] Shipley also participates in government anti-terrorism training, corporate security and executive preparedness consulting. Stewart sold his majority ownership in Shipley Group in December 2012 before being sworn in as a U.S. congressman.[7]

Writing career

Stewart began writing books in the late 1990s. His first novel, Shattered Bone, was published in 1998.[8] Stewart wrote four additional techno-thrillers before he began writing the series The Great and Terrible. Before completing his last book in that series, he started writing historical novels. His book Seven Miracles That Saved America was chosen as “Book of the Month”, and The Miracle of Freedom: Seven Tipping Points That Saved the World became a New York Times Bestseller within two weeks of publication and was selected for the National Communications Award by the Freedom Foundation at Valley Forge. The Miracle of Freedom and Seven Miracles That Saved America were co-written with his brother, U.S. district judge Ted Stewart. The Miracle of Freedom was endorsed by radio/talk show host Glenn Beck, who has been credited for making the book a bestseller.[9][10] Stewart has written 14 books.[11][unreliable source] He worked with Elizabeth Smart to co-write her memoir, My Story.[12] In 2005, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir performed A Christmas Bell for Anya, which he co-authored with his wife Evie.[13][14]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2012

On October 21, 2011, Utah Policy wrote that Stewart was going to run for Congress in Utah’s 2nd congressional district.[15] His formal announcement took place on December 6, 2011.[16][17]

In February 2012, Stewart released a campaign video expressing his view that “if we don’t make some difficult decisions now, if we don’t show the courage to do what we have to do to save our country, we won’t make it for another 10 years.” He also said that “at critical times in our history… we literally had miracles where God intervened to save us.”[18]

On April 21, 2012, at a controversial nominating convention, Stewart secured the Republican nomination. Before the convention, an anonymous anti-Stewart mailer was sent to convention delegates. In his speech to delegates, another candidate, Milt Hanks, alleged that the other candidates had made an anti-Stewart pact. Stewart’s opponents considered the mailer and the allegations to be a set-up to elicit sympathy for Stewart’s candidacy; they later filed a complaint with the Federal Elections Commission over the incident.[18][19] A subsequent party inquiry showed no proof of wrongdoing by any candidate.[1]

Stewart won the general election with 62% of the vote, defeating Jay Seegmiller, and took office on January 3, 2013.

2014

In the 2014 election, Stewart was challenged by Luz Robles, a state senator and vice president of Zions Bank. Robles suspended campaigning for two months to serve as caregiver for her daughter and mother, who were seriously injured in a car accident.[20]

2016

In the 2016 election, Stewart faced Charlene Albarran, a business owner.[21] Stewart defeated Albarran with 62% of the vote.

2018

Stewart faced Shireen Ghorbani, an Iranian-American, in the 2018 election. As of April 2018, Stewart had six times as much cash on hand as Ghorbani.[22] Stewart defeated Ghorbani with 56% of the vote.[23]

2020

UtahPolicy.com reported the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee considered Stewart potentially vulnerable to a strong opponent, due to Donald Trump‘s unpopularity in the 2nd District and Stewart’s record of defending him.[24]

A poll taken in January 2020 among likely voters showed Stewart with 38% of the vote and a Democratic challenger with 36% of the vote. The remainder were undecided or voting for someone else.[25]

Stewart defeated Kael Weston, a former State Department employee, in the general election.[26]

Tenure

Stewart chaired the House Subcommittee on the Environment.[27]

In 2016, Stewart introduced a bill to allow unused Ebolavirus funding to research and combat the Zika virus.[28] In 2017, the proposal was adopted as part of a separate bill, the Zika Response Appropriations Act, which shifted $622 million in unused Ebola funding to fight Zika.[29]

A July 2019 poll showed Stewart with the lowest approval rating of any Utah congressperson.[30]

Iraq

In June 2021, Stewart was one of 49 House Republicans to vote to repeal the AUMF against Iraq.[31][32]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Utah’s 2nd congressional district: Results 2012–[38]
YearRepublicanVotesPctDemocratVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct
2012Chris Stewart154,52362Jay Seegmiller83,17633Jonathan D. GarrardConstitution5,0512Joseph AndradeIndependent2,9711Charles KimballIndependent2,8241
2014Chris Stewart88,91561Luz Robles47,58533Shaun McCauslandConstitution4,5093Wayne HillIndependent American3,3282Bill BarronIndependent1,7341
2016Chris Stewart170,52462Charlene Albarran93,77834Paul McCollaum Jr.Constitution12,5175
2018Chris Stewart151,48956Shireen Ghorbani105,05139Jeffrey WhippleLibertarian13,5045

Political positions

Healthcare

Stewart’s official congressional webpage highlights his efforts to defund and repeal Obamacare

According to his website, since arriving in Congress, Stewart has “consistently supported efforts to defund and repeal Obamacare.” He co-sponsored the Defund Obamacare Act of 2013 and supported other efforts to “repeal, defund or dismantle the law.” He also promised to “continue to do all that [he] can to seek strategic opportunities to… defund, delay and repeal this healthcare law.” In place of Obamacare, Stewart supported the American Healthcare Reform Act.[39]

Environment

As of 2013, Stewart rejected the idea that climate change is caused by human activity.[27]

In 2014, Stewart sponsored H.R. 1422 (113th Congress), the EPA Science Advisory Board Reform Act of 2014, which would reform the composition and activities of the Environmental Protection Agency‘s science advisory board. Under the bill, at least 10% of the members of the board would be required to be from state, local, or tribal governments, corporate and industry experts would no longer be excluded from the board, and board members would be prohibited from advising the EPA in discussions that cite their work. The bill was opposed by Democrats and critics such as the Union of Concerned Scientists, who said it would enable conflicts of interest and restrict scientists’ ability to provide proper advice to the government.[40][41]

Stewart has a 3% lifetime rating from the League of Conservation Voters.[42]

Economic issues

During the 2012 campaign, Stewart stated “we can’t continue to have 1.2-, 1.3-, 1.4-trillion-dollar deficits for the foreseeable future and just pretend that that’s not going to matter, because it will.”[18]

Stewart supports simplifying the tax code, lowering the corporate tax rate, and eliminating the estate tax.[43] He voted for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[44]

Bundy standoff

In an interview regarding the Bundy standoff of 2014, Stewart said that the Bureau of Land Management could have avoided the standoff by allowing local sheriffs to intervene. Citing concerns about the level of weaponry federal agents carried, he also sponsored a bill (H.R. 4934) to demilitarize federal regulatory agencies.[45][46]

Donald Trump

Stewart is considered “one of President Trump’s most steadfast defenders in Congress.”[24] For instance, after Trump said he would be open to receiving intelligence on a campaign opponent from a foreign country and not alerting the FBI, Stewart defended him, saying that if the information is “credible, I think it would be foolish not to take that information.”[47] According to Ellen Weintraub, the chairwoman of the Federal Election Commission, it is illegal for a campaign to accept anything of value from a foreign person or entity in regard to a U.S. election.[48]

According to political polling and reporting website FiveThirtyEight, Stewart’s votes aligned with Trump’s positions about 95% of the time.[49] Stewart was reportedly under consideration to serve in the Trump administration as acting Director of National Intelligence,[50] but Richard Grenell was chosen instead.[51]

During the 2016 Republican presidential primary, Stewart was critical of Trump. Addressing an audience at the Hinckley Institute of Politics, Stewart compared him to fascist dictator Benito Mussolini, saying, “if some of you are Donald Trump supporters, we see the world differently, because I can’t imagine what someone is thinking.”[52]

Mueller investigation

After Attorney General William Barr released a redacted version of the Mueller Report, Stewart released the following statement:

Mr. Mueller conducted a detailed and thorough investigation that mirrors what we found in the House Intelligence investigation—no collusion or conspiracy between the Trump Campaign and Russia.[53]

Stewart’s statement did not address the issue of obstruction of justice. The Mueller Report stated that “while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him” from the charge of obstruction of justice.[54]

After the report’s release, Stewart accused the “former leadership” of the FBI, the Department of Justice, and the CIA of “astounding” corruption, without providing any details or supporting evidence. He also called for a second special counsel to investigate Hillary Clinton’s emails and allegations of spying on the Trump campaign that led to the Mueller investigation.[55]

Stewart was the only member of Congress from Utah to question Mueller during his appearance before Congress on July 24, 2019. He confronted Mueller about leaks that he asserted came from Mueller’s office and were allegedly “designed to weaken or embarrass” Trump.[56] Others, including Washington, D.C.-area media reporters, considered Mueller’s office an unlikely source of the leaks.[57]

Ukraine scandal and impeachment inquiry

Stewart defended Trump’s actions with regard to the Trump–Ukraine scandal. In his opening statement during impeachment proceedings as a member of the House Intelligence Committee, Stewart apparently characterized the impeachment inquiry as a coup d’état when he said, “the coup has started”, but later declined to clarify his remark.[58]

During the impeachment hearings, Stewart repeatedly defended Trump’s behavior, criticized witnesses whose testimony implicated Trump in wrongdoing, and criticized the impeachment process.[59] He called for Adam Schiff, the chair of the United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, to recuse himself from the investigation of Trump’s dealings.[60]

When Trump called for Senator Mitt Romney‘s “impeachment” and Stewart was asked to comment, he declined to defend Romney. Romney had expressed support for the committee’s inquiry. (Senators cannot be impeached.)[61]

On December 18, 2019, Stewart voted against both articles of impeachment against Trump. Of the 195 Republican representatives who voted, all voted against both impeachment articles.

References

  1. ^ a b “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on January 10, 2013. Retrieved 2012-11-08.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ Palmer, Douglas (February 11, 1996). “Mothers honored for the love and service they give families”. Deseret News. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  3. ^ Stewart.house.gov. “Biography”.
  4. ^ “Awards”. National Aeronautic Association. Archived from the original on September 27, 2011. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  5. ^ “Squadron Service 1985-2001”. Targetlock. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  6. ^ “The Shipley Group”. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  7. ^ “New Utah congressman sells his consulting business”. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  8. ^ Stewart, Chris (1998). Shattered Bone. M. Evans & Company. ISBN 9780871318312.
  9. ^ “Author Chris Stewart running for 2nd District seat”. Deseret News. November 9, 2011. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  10. ^ “Glenn Beck catapults The Miracle of Freedom to bestseller”. Shadow Mountain. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  11. ^ Chris Stewart at Goodreads
  12. ^ “Elizabeth Smart to finally publish her own version of her abduction”. New York Daily News. Retrieved July 30, 2013.
  13. ^ Stewart, Chris (2006). “A Christmas Bell for Anya”. Shadow Mountain. Archived from the original on May 4, 2012. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  14. ^ Haddock, Sharon (June 29, 2006). “Patriotic author stresses sacrifice”. Deseret News. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  15. ^ “Add Another Republican Name to the 2nd District Race”. Utah Policy.
  16. ^ Gehrke, Robert. “Two new candidates join GOP field for 2nd District”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  17. ^ Montero, David. “Stewart launches bid with help of Bangerter, Hansen, Beck”. Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  18. ^ a b c “Utah Set to Send Glenn Beck-Approved End Times Novelist to Congress”. Mother Jones.
  19. ^ “Holy Ghost employed to ensure victory”. Salt Lake Tribune.
  20. ^ “2nd District: Stewart, Robles reject extremist labels”. Salt Lake Tribune.
  21. ^ “Albarran taking on Stewart in Utah’s 2nd District”. The Spectrum.
  22. ^ “In her bid to unseat Rep. Chris Stewart, Democrat Shireen Ghorbani is finding that many voters don’t even know the name of their congressman”. Salt Lake Tribune.
  23. ^ O’Donoghue, Amy Joi (November 6, 2018). “Democratic challenger Shireen Ghorbani concedes in Utah’s District 2 race to Rep. Chris Stewart”. Deseret News.
  24. ^ a b “National Democrats think Rep. Chris Stewart could be vulnerable in 2020”. UtahPolicy.com.
  25. ^ “Poll suggests Reps. Chris Stewart and Ben McAdams could have tough re-election campaigns in November”. UtahPolicy.com.
  26. ^ “Republicans will have a four-way primary for governor in June as Greg Hughes joins Cox, Huntsman and Wright on the ballot”. UtahPolicy.com.
  27. ^ a b “Stewart cautious on climate change”. Salt Lake Tribune.
  28. ^ Thomas Burr,
    Utah’s Chris Stewart seeks Ebola money to fight Zika virus, St. Louis Tribune (February 3, 2016).
  29. ^ Matt Canham, House passes Chris Stewart-led Zika bill, White House threatens veto, St. Louis Tribune (May 20, 2017).
  30. ^ “McAdams has the highest approval rating of Utah’s members of Congress, while Romney gets the highest disapproval”. UtahPolicy.com.
  31. ^ “House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq War authorization”.
  32. ^ https://clerk.house.gov/evs/2021/roll172.xml
  33. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  34. ^ Stewart.house.gov. “Committees and Caucuses”. Retrieved September 5, 2019.
  35. ^ “Members”. Congressional Western Caucus. Retrieved June 25, 2018.
  36. ^ “Our Members”. U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Archived from the original on August 1, 2018. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  37. ^ “Members”. U.S. – Japan Caucus. Retrieved January 9, 2019.
  38. ^ “Chris Stewart”. ballotpedia.org. Retrieved September 4, 2019.
  39. ^ “I’m Working to Defund and Delay Obamacare”. stewart.house.gov. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  40. ^ Marcos, Cristina (November 18, 2014). “House passes bill to reform EPA science panel”. The Hill. Retrieved November 21, 2014.
  41. ^ “A letter from the Union of Concerned Scientists to the House of Representatives” (PDF). Union of Concerned Scientists. November 17, 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 27, 2014. Retrieved November 21, 2014.
  42. ^ “National Scorecard, Chris Stewart”. League of Conservation Voters. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  43. ^ “Issues:Tax Reform”. stewart.house.gov. Retrieved December 19, 2019.
  44. ^ “Tax Reform Conference Report Passes House”. Press Release, stewart.house.gov.
  45. ^ Glionna, John (August 4, 2014). “BLM, local law enforcement tensions near breaking point in the West”. The Los Angeles Times.
  46. ^ “H.R. 4934 – Regulatory Agency Demilitarization Act”. June 23, 2014.
  47. ^ “Utah Rep. Chris Stewart says it would be ‘foolish’ for a candidate not to look at foreign intel against an opponent”. Salt Lake Tribune.
  48. ^ “One public servant follows her oath, while another violates it”. Washington Post.
  49. ^ “Tracking Congress in the Age of Trump: Chris Stewart”. FiveThirtyEight. January 30, 2017. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  50. ^ “Advisers pushing Trump to nominate Stewart for top intelligence post”. UtahPolicy.com.
  51. ^ “Ambassador Richard Grenell to be named director of national intelligence”. Fox News.
  52. ^ “Utah’s Rep. Chris Stewart calls Trump ‘our Mussolini. KUTV.
  53. ^ “Stewart Reacts to Mueller Report Release”. Office of Christ Stewart, Press Release. April 18, 2019.
  54. ^ “Mueller Finds No Trump-Russia Conspiracy, but Stops Short of Exonerating President on Obstruction”. New York Times.
  55. ^ “Some Republicans want an apology over Mueller investigation”. Roll Call.
  56. ^ “Utah Rep. Chris Stewart grills Robert Mueller on alleged leaks”. Deseret News.
  57. ^ “Utah representative accuses Mueller of leaks”. Fox 13 Salt Lake City.
  58. ^ “Utah Rep. Chris Stewart says ‘the coup has started’ during opening day of public impeachment hearings”. Salt Lake Tribune.
  59. ^ For example, see Rep. Chris Stewart predicts impeachment hearings will turn Americans to support Trump, Salt Lake Tribune, Thomas Burr, November 15, 2019. Retrieved November 16, 2019.
  60. ^ “Rep. Chris Stewart on calls for full House vote on impeachment, Adam Schiff’s recusal”. Fox News.
  61. ^ Burr, Thomas (October 6, 2019). “Utah Rep. Chris Stewart defends Trump but not Sen. Mitt Romney”. Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved November 16, 2019.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jim Matheson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Utah’s 2nd congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Raul Ruiz
United States representatives by seniority
188th
Succeeded by
Eric Swalwell


Issues

Source: Government page

Defense and National Security

I believe that the fundamental responsibility of the federal government is to provide for our mutual defense. Recent world events in the Middle-east and North Africa illustrate that we still live in a dangerous world. Hostilities are growing in many corners of the world. History assures us that another security crisis will come. When it does, it is absolutely essential that we be prepared. We must keep our military strong. We must provide our troops with the tools that they need to succeed.President Obama has neglected the military during his administration. As recent events in Ukraine, Iraq and Syria have shown, the world is not ready for a smaller U.S. military. Now we have seen what happens when the U.S. refuses to honor its obligation as the world’s only superpower, a nation that has stood for something rare and exceptional for generations.

As an Air Force veteran and your Congressman, I am dedicated to ensuring your security and well-being. I can guarantee that no stone will remain unturned as I work to protect American families. Additionally, I am fully aware of the need for government scrutiny and have committed myself to pursuing responsible military spending. By closing overseas bases and streamlining operations, the military can sustain some reductions in spending without hurting national security. I am fully dedicated to safeguarding American safety both home and abroad.

Economy and Jobs

As a former small business owner, my employees were like my own family. I know many Utahns that are suffering through what has become the slowest economic recovery since the Great Depression.

I’ve learned that if you want to restore hope for the American worker, give them a job. Foster an environment where jobs are being created and the economy is growing. It’s American small businesses that are moving our economy forward. I will continue to work to create an environment that favors job creation, small businesses and a strong economy.

Education

Education is a vital part of our economy, and good education programs will ensure success both now and in the future. As a father of six children, I am deeply interested in the quality of education that our children receive in the State of Utah. I strongly believe that education decisions are best decided at state and local levels. Local and state leaders—those who have direct interaction with parents and teachers in their communities—are best positioned to determine policies that affect Utah’s students, not Washington bureaucrats. I support legislation that keeps education choices in the hands of parents, along with local and state leaders.

Energy

Energy independence is vital to national security. In order to become less dependent on foreign energy, we must be able to pursue responsible development within our own borders. Maintaining a diverse energy portfolio will protect our current and future interests, while creating jobs at home.I support the responsible development of oil, natural gas, clean coal, and a variety economically viable renewable energy options. We are fortunate to live in a district full of scenic and natural resources. Multiple use land policies enable their responsible use, while protecting their integrity. I am committed to protecting environmental integrity while also supporting energy development to bring in needed revenue, jobs, and overall security.

Financial Services

The Financial Services industry is vital to our economy. In 2010, Congress passed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. This lengthy document, however well-intentioned, was poorly-designed. The Financial Services Committee of the House of Representatives reported that of the 400 rules required to be established under the Act, only 224 have been written. These 224 rules and regulations already consume 7,365 pages and will require private sector job-creators to spend 24,180,856 hours to comply with the rules.The Dodd-Frank Act is hindering financial institutions and small businesses. Instead of focusing their efforts on creating jobs and growing our economy, small businesses and financial institutions are spending increasing amounts of time and money to comply with the rules. Rather than hindering these institutions and businesses, we must seek to help them succeed and, in turn, spur the economy.

Health

Our health care and insurance systems need reform. In 2010, Congress enacted the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as ObamaCare. The Supreme Court ruled in 2012 that the penalty assessed to individuals who fail to purchase insurance is a tax. As a former small business owner in Davis County, I see and understand the stresses that this tax penalty is forcing upon business owners throughout our district. Not only are jobs being killed by the implementation of Obamacare but it is crushing economic activity. The purpose of the Affordable Care Act was to drive insurance premiums down. But instead we see the exact opposite – some premiums rising as much as 400 percent. This makes ObamaCare the largest tax increase on the American people. As your Congressman, I will work to defund, repeal and replace Obamacare.

X
John CurtisJohn Curtis

Current Position: US Representative for UT-03 since 2017
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Mayor from 2010 – 2017

Featured Video:
Utah Rep. John Curtis launches new caucuses for Republicans to address climate change

News

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for UT-03 since 2017
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Mayor from 2010 – 2017

Featured Video:
Utah Rep. John Curtis launches new caucuses for Republicans to address climate change

About

John Curtis 1

Source: Government page

John R. Curtis proudly represents Utah’s 3rd Congressional District, serving on the House Energy and Commerce Committees. After being elected to Congress on November 13, 2017, John sponsored 12 bills in his first year in office. Four of these bills passed through the House and three were signed into law: The POPPY Study Act to combat the opioid crisis, the Public-Private Partnership Advisory Council to End Human Trafficking Act, and the Small Business ACE Act.

The Congressman cares deeply about hearing the diverse perspectives and feedback from his constituents: he has held hundreds of town halls. Utah’s third district is the youngest in the country, with an average age of 26 years old. John is also sensitive to the many constituents that live in rural Utah, and has focused on legislation that can fit needs of both demographics such as student loans, rural broadband access, and more.

John has been committed to helping Utah’s growing tech scene flourish, and was recognized by Silicon Slopes as their first Community Hero Award recipient. Other personal awards comprise of Civic Innovator of the Year by Utah Valley University, Thayne Robson Award for Leadership in Economic Development, and Outstanding Citizen Award from the Office of Civic Engagement Leadership by Brigham Young University.

Prior to coming to Washington, John was the 45th mayor of Provo City, serving two terms. Known for his personal approach to city government, Mayor Curtis prioritized his outreach to residents of Provo by utilizing various channels including his popular blog. He was named the #1 Top Elected Official on Social Media 2015 by the Government Social Media group and has been recognized by Forbes for his commitment to citizen engagement. Curtis was re-elected for a second four-year term as mayor in 2013 with 86.49% of the vote. As mayor, he averaged an approval rating of 93%.

During his terms in office, the city of Provo ranked #1 in the nation for Business and Careers by Forbes as well as #1 for Well-Being by Gallup. Other recent awards include national recognition for the quality of life, family environment, a booming tech and entrepreneur culture and a successful revitalization of downtown. With the help of the City Council, employees, and residents, Mayor Curtis’ administration brought Google Fiber to Provo, regularly scheduled air service at the airport, expanded parks and trails, and completed Provo’s state-of-the-art recreation center.

Before becoming mayor, John was a small business owner in Provo, working with his partners to build their business “Action Target,” where he led sales and operations strategy.

Congressman Curtis and his wife Sue have six children and seven grandchildren. He speaks Mandarin Chinese and almost certainly has more socks than you do.

Committees

House Energy and Commerce Committee:

  • Subcommittee on Health
  • Subcommittee on Communications & Technology
  • Subcommittee on Environment & Climate Change

Caucuses

Dietary Supplement Caucus (Co-Chair); Wildfire Caucus (Co-Chair); Biomedical Research Caucus (Co-Chair); Olympic Caucus (Co-Chair); Direct Selling Caucus; Blockchain Caucus; Western Caucus; Congressional Coal Caucus; Ski Caucus; Taiwan Caucus; Problem Solvers Caucus; and Conservative Climate Caucus (Chair).

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

Washington DC

Washington DC Office
2400 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-7751

District Offices

Provo Office
3549 North University Avenue
Suite 275
Provo, UT 84604
Phone: (801) 922-5400

 

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Twitter

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Wikipedia entry

John Curtis may refer to:

Politicians

Sports

Religion

Others

See also


Voting Record

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia entry

John Ream Curtis (born May 10, 1960) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Utah’s 3rd congressional district since 2017.[1][2] A Republican who was once a Democrat, he served as mayor of Provo, Utah, from 2010 to 2017. On November 7, 2017, he won a special election to replace Jason Chaffetz in Congress, after Chaffetz resigned.

Early life

John Curtis was born May 10, 1960, in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were Jesse Duckworth “Dee” Curtis (1927–2015) and Hazel Dawn Curtis (née Ream, 1925–2016). They married in 1955.

Curtis attended high school at Skyline High School, where he met his wife, Sue Snarr. He graduated from Brigham Young University with a degree in business management. He worked for OC Tanner and the Citizen Watch Company before taking a position as the COO of a Provo-based company, Action Target, in 2000.

Curtis ran for the Utah State Senate in 2000 as a Democrat against Curt Bramble, losing 33% to 66%.[3] From 2002 to 2003, he served as vice chairman and chairman of the Utah County Democratic Party.[4][5]

Mayor of Provo

Curtis was elected mayor of Provo in 2009, defeating former legislator Stephen Clark with 53% of the vote on a platform of safety, prosperity, and unity.[6][7] In office, he focused on economic development, revitalization of Downtown Provo, and getting a beach at Utah Lake. He launched clean air and recreation initiatives, preserved Rock Canyon, and launched a blog widely read by residents.[8] He also assisted with the purchase of iProvo, Provo City’s existing fiber internet network, by Google Fiber.[9]

Curtis was reelected in 2013 with 86% of the vote.[10][11] In November 2016, he announced he would not seek reelection to a third term.

During his last years in office, he averaged an approval rating of 93%.[12]

Awards

  • Community Hero Award (Silicon Slopes, 2017)[13]
  • Civic Innovator of the Year Award (UVU, Office of New Urban Mechanics, 2017)[14]
  • Outstanding Citizen Award (BYU, Office of Civic Engagement Leadership, 2017)[14]
  • 2017 Freedom Festival Grand Marshal[15]
  • Person of the Year (Utah Clean Air, 2017)[16]
  • Person of the Year Award (Utah Valley Magazine, 2017)[17]
  • Top Elected Official on Social Media (Government Social Media, 2015)[18]
  • The Star Award (SCERA Center for the Arts, 2015)[19]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2017 special

Curtis’s campaign photo

On May 25, 2017, Curtis announced his candidacy for that year’s special election in Utah’s 3rd congressional district to replace Jason Chaffetz, who resigned on June 30. On August 15, Curtis won the Republican nomination over Christopher Herrod and Tanner Ainge.[2] On November 7, he won the general election over Democratic nominee Kathie Allen.

Tenure

Curtis was sworn into office on November 13, 2017. Since being elected to Congress, he has held more than 100 town hall meetings,[20] including a “walking town hall” to the top of Mount Timpanogos.[21]

On October 16, 2019, Utah Policy reported Curtis had the second-highest approval rating among Utah’s four U.S. Representatives. According to the Utah Policy and Y2 Analytics poll, 45% of 3rd Congressional District registered voters approved of his performance.[22]

On December 18, 2019, Curtis voted against both articles of impeachment against Trump. Of the 195 Republicans who voted, all voted against both impeachment articles.

On May 19, 2021, Curtis was one of 35 Republicans who joined all Democrats in voting to approve legislation to establish the January 6 commission meant to investigate the storming of the U.S. Capitol.[23]

Bears Ears National Monument

On December 4, 2017, Curtis and fellow Utah representatives Rob Bishop, Chris Stewart and Mia Love introduced a bill to codify the Trump administration’s reduction of Bears Ears National Monument by creating two new national monuments in the remaining areas Trump defined.[24]

On January 9, 2018, members of the Tribes of the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition testified against the bill, including Shaun Chapoose, a member of the Ute Indian Tribe and Utah Business Committee.[25]

SPEED Act

On June 13, 2018, Curtis introduced H.R. 6088, the “Streamlining Permitting Efficiencies in Energy Development Act” or “SPEED Act”. The legislation proposes streamlining the oil and gas permitting process by allowing Bureau of Land Management to expedite approval for drilling activities that pose little or no environmental harm. The Mineral Leasing Act would be amended by establishing procedures where an operator may conduct drilling and production activities on available Federal land and Non-Federal land.[26][27] Community members criticized Curtis over this sponsorship, claiming it omits the required environmental impact analysis, and allows drilling on land without notifying the public or providing opportunity to comment.[28]

Public-Private Partnership Advisory Council to End Human Trafficking Act

On December 12, 2018, Curtis introduced H.R. 7271, the “Public-Private Partnership Advisory Council to End Human Trafficking Act”, the companion bill to Senator Orrin Hatch‘s legislation. The bill creates a Public-Private Advisory Council to provide a direct line to federal government agencies to streamline bureaucratic hurdles while empowering nonprofits and nongovernmental organizations in fighting human trafficking.[29]

Government Shutdown Prevention Act

On January 16, 2019, Curtis and Lloyd Smucker introduced the Government Shutdown Prevention Act. The legislation aims to end political game-playing and fix Congress’s dysfunctional budget process. If passed, it would automatically continue government funding through a continuing resolution. The bill would implement a five percent spending penalty on the day the continuing resolution begins. Federal spending would be reduced by two percent 60 days after the first day of the fiscal year and by an additional two percent each subsequent 60-day period.[30] Curtis said, “The American people expect Congress to do its most basic job: pass a budget and fund the government. If we can’t, then we shouldn’t get paid.” Curtis asked the Clerk of the House to withhold his pay until the government is fully funded. He believes that Republicans and Democrats should be held accountable to find common ground to solve funding impasses.[31]

Transparency in Student Lending Act

On January 28, 2019, Curtis introduced the Transparency in Student Lending Act, legislation to improve the information provided to students and families taking on federal loans to finance higher education. The bill would require the disclosure of the annual percentage rate (APR) for federal student loans before disbursement. The APR assists borrowers by showing the true cost of a loan, helping students and their families make more informed financial decisions. Curtis said, “As the primary provider of the vast majority of student loans and education financing options, the federal government should provide a transparent and full accounting of associated costs and fees for borrowers. I represent the youngest Congressional district in the country with an average age of 26 years old; these students must be equipped to make the right decisions for their families and their futures.”[32]

Bicameral Congressional Trade Authority Act

On February 1, 2019, Curtis introduced the Bicameral Congressional Trade Authority Act of 2019. The bill would require the president to submit to Congress any proposal to adjust imports in the interest of national security under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. A companion bill was introduced in the Senate.[33] Curtis said the trade war was mostly hurting small businesses and that he had heard for months almost daily, if not daily, weekly from businesses it’s hurting and unfortunately it’s having a disproportionate impact on small businesses. And 99 percent of the businesses in my district are small businesses. We need to quickly resolve this because they’re the ones who are least able to sustain it. This bill ensures their priorities will be incorporated.”[34]

Natural Resources Management Act

On March 11, 2019, the Natural Resources Management Act, considered a highly significant public lands bill, was signed into law. The act consists of about 100 bills joined into one, including two proposals carried by Curtis.[35]

On February 26, 2019, Curtis spoke on the House floor, advocating for the Natural Resources Management Act. “The Emery County bill has been a locally driven effort and will bring long-term certainty to the area through various designations and expanding Goblin Valley State Park for better management,” he said. “It will also generate millions of dollars to help Utah’s schoolchildren through school trust land exchanges.” The House passed the largest public lands bill in decades, establishing hundreds of thousands of acres of wilderness across the nation, including a vast swath of Utah, and allowing the creation of a new national monument.[36]

The Natural Resources Management Act is a public lands package that comprises over 100 individual bills, including ten locally driven pieces of legislation that directly impact Utah.[37]

In May 2018, Curtis drew criticism after introducing the Emery County Public Land Management Act of 2018. Opponents argued the bill omitted approximately 900,000 acres of wilderness in its proposed designation, including Labyrinth Canyon and Muddy Creek. Conservation groups accused Curtis of removing the existing Wilderness Study Area protection to facilitate coal mining.[38] One of these opponents, the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance (SUWA), ultimately supported the legislation.[39][40][41]

On June 25, 2018, it was announced that the congressional subcommittee overstated environmental groups’ support for the Emery County Public Land Management Act of 2018. An aide to Curtis stated there was a mix-up and the record would be corrected. Seven environmental organizations were named as supporting the legislation in a June 18 background memo ahead of a hearing before the Federal Lands Subcommittee, but just one of the groups named said it was accurate to call it a supporter.[42]

Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act

On July 10, 2019, Curtis spoke on the House floor to advocate for HR 1044, the Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019, legislation that he co-authored to eliminate the per-country caps for employment-based visas and shift to a first-come, first-served process. Curtis, whose district is home to several high-tech businesses, said he regularly hears from leaders of those company’s that they “do not have enough high-skilled workers … and demand continues to outstrip supply.”[43] He added, “this legislation will create a first-come, first-serve system providing certainty to workers and families and enabling US companies to flourish and compete in a global economy as they hire the brightest people to create products, services, and jobs—regardless of where they were born.” After he spoke, the legislation passed the House, 365-65.[44]

House Foreign Affairs Committee

Curtis participated in a panel discussion at a U.S. Global Leadership Coalition forum on April 5, 2019, highlighting the importance of American diplomacy and foreign aid in bolstering U.S. national security and creating economic opportunities for Utah businesses. “As a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, I am committed to supporting the vital U.S. government programs that protect our nation’s interests abroad”, he said. “Our global ties help to open new markets for U.S. businesses and create jobs for Americans, while U.S. diplomats and development workers overseas are preventing conflicts and wiping out diseases before they reach our borders.”[45]

House Natural Resources Committee

On February 13, 2019, Curtis invited the National Parks, Forests and Public Lands Subcommittee to join the Clean Air Challenge and find common ground to address Utah’s and the country’s environmental issues. Curtis then introduced the Provo Clean Air Toolkit, which contains strategies that Utahns can use to improve the quality on personal levels and businesses can use on larger scales. He then asked the subcommittee to take the “Provo Clean Air Challenge Pledge” with him and the rest of Utah to pass along the clean-air initiative.[46]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Personal and professional life

Curtis is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served a two-year mission in Taiwan. He and his wife Sue have six children.

Curtis has two older sisters, Camille and Kristine, and a younger brother, Kitt. Through his father, he is a descendant of Brigham Young. His great-uncle is LeGrand R. Curtis, and his first cousin once removed is LeGrand R. Curtis Jr., a current General Authority Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints also serving as Church Historian.

Curtis has also served on several community and advisory boards including the Provo/Orem Chamber of Commerce (now ), the Mountain Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross, the Utah National Parks Council of the Boys Scouts of America, and the Utah Valley Healthcare Foundation.

As a public figure, he has gained recognition for his wide collection of socks.[8][54]

Controversies

On March 20, 2018, five women filed a lawsuit claiming the city of Provo and Curtis (as mayor) failed to take action to protect them from alleged sexual harassment and assault by former police chief John King, despite allegations of misconduct in 2015 and 2016.[55] Plaintiffs accused King of a broad range of sexual misconduct, including staring at their breasts, making inappropriate comments, uninvited touching, groping and, in one case, rape.[56]

City Council members told the Deseret News that they held a closed-door meeting about King’s conduct in late 2015 or early 2016. The lawsuit alleged that Curtis chilled reporting by telling police department supervisors in fall 2014 that “he did not want to receive any more complaints about Chief King.” The complaint read, “Chief King was going to remain chief of the department as long as Curtis was in office and there was nothing the supervisors could do about it”.[57] Curtis said the meeting was mischaracterized, that he had called the meeting to discuss a new, unpopular “beat program” that King had implemented in the police department. He said there was also concern in the department that King would not stay in Provo long because his wife did not move to Utah with him. “That was absolutely all”, Curtis said. “Never, under any circumstances, would I infer that they were expected to follow him if anything was not appropriate, let alone sexual harassment.”[58] Councilman Gary Winterton confirmed the council had such a discussion about King, with the chief present, but he said he could not say much about the meeting because it was a closed session. Winterton said he could not say what type of administrative action, if any, was taken. The lawsuit stated the meeting did not result in any discipline of King.[59]

In March 2017, King resigned after the rape allegation at Curtis’s request, even though Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill had declined to bring charges.[56] In an email obtained by the Deseret News through a records request, King thanked Curtis for his support: “You did your best to protect me at the press conference”, he wrote. “I am deeply sorry for putting you in this terrible position.”[57]

On March 23, 2018, Curtis clarified that as Provo’s mayor, he heard three, not just two, complaints of inappropriate sexual conduct against King. The first time, Curtis said, he warned King that even if his alleged actions had been misinterpreted, King shouldn’t put himself in positions where his actions could be misinterpreted. The second time, he ordered King to retake sexual harassment training and reiterated that he should not go past a certain point while visiting women at the department’s dispatch center. The third time, after a student volunteer accused King of rape in early 2017, Curtis asked for King’s resignation.[60]

In response, Curtis said, “One of the things I’m learning is what women expect is more than checking the boxes legally. They need a lot of emotional support and understanding. And we don’t talk a lot about that portion of what do you do when these things happen. So, in a way, if you think about this, I’m seeing, like, ‘OK, my primary responsibility is to get this into the right hands.’ I read her comments about how what I did made her feel, and it was clear to me that she expected more from me than just getting it into the right hands. Lesson learned.”[60]

Electoral history

2017 Utah’s 3rd congressional district special election Republican primary[61]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican John Curtis 31,481 43.28%
RepublicanChris Herrod23,68632.57%
RepublicanTanner Ainge17,56524.15%
Total votes72,732 100.00%
2017 Utah’s 3rd congressional district special election[62]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanJohn Curtis85,73958.03%
DemocraticKathie Allen37,77825.57%
United UtahJim Bennett13,7459.30%
IndependentSean Whalen4,5503.08%
LibertarianJoe Buchman3,6432.47%
Jason Christensen2,2861.55%
Write-inBrendan Phillips
Write-inRussell Paul Roesler
Total votes147,741 100.00%
Republican hold
2018 Utah’s 3rd congressional district Republican primary[63]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican John Curtis (incumbent) 66,404 73.32
RepublicanChris Herrod24,15826.68
Total votes90,562 100.0
2018 Utah’s 3rd congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican John Curtis (incumbent) 174,856 67.5
DemocraticJames Singer70,68627.3
Gregory Duerden6,6862.6
United UtahTimothy Zeidner6,6302.6
Total votes258,858 100.0
Republican hold
2020 Utah’s 3rd congressional district election[64]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican John Curtis (Incumbent) 246,674 68.77
DemocraticDevin Thorpe96,06726.78
ConstitutionDaniel Cummings8,8892.48
United UtahThomas McNeill7,0401.97
Total votes358,670 100.00
Republican hold

References

  1. ^ Provo City website. Accessed April 19, 2013.
  2. ^ a b Bloch, Matthew; Lee, Jasmine (August 16, 2017). “Utah Election Results: Curtis Wins Republican Primary for U.S. House Seat”. The New York Times. Retrieved August 16, 2017.
  3. ^ “Utah County 2000 General Election Results”. www.utahcounty.gov. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  4. ^ Roche, Lisa Riley (July 30, 2017). “John Curtis: No political party has ‘exclusivity on everything that’s good. DeseretNews.com. Retrieved July 19, 2018.
  5. ^ “Utah County Democrats pick a chief”. DeseretNews.com. April 9, 2003. Retrieved July 19, 2018.
  6. ^ “Curtis wins Provo mayor race; incumbents tossed in some other races”.
  7. ^ “Meet Mayor Curtis”. Provo City. 2013. Archived from the original on November 19, 2013. Retrieved December 12, 2013.
  8. ^ a b “John Curtis: the Republican congressional hopeful, one-time watch salesman and … sock enthusiast?”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  9. ^ Pugmire, Genelle. “Provo mayor announces Google Fiber for Small Businesses in State of City”. Daily Herald. Retrieved July 18, 2017.
  10. ^ “Curtis soars to victory and second term in Provo”.
  11. ^ “Provo City Mayor John Curtis wins re-election – The Daily Universe”. Retrieved May 18, 2016.
  12. ^ HERALD, Genelle Pugmire DAILY. “Provo Mayor John Curtis announces he will not seek re-election”. Daily Herald. Retrieved July 18, 2017.
  13. ^ “Commentary: Curtis is the right representative for Utah’s tech community”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  14. ^ a b “About John – Congressman Curtis”. Congressman Curtis. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  15. ^ Correspondent, Alex Sousa. “Provo Mayor John Curtis honored as the Freedom Festival Grand Marshal”. Daily Herald. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  16. ^ “Op-ed: Sen. Lee is putting coal over Provo”. DeseretNews.com. July 3, 2017. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  17. ^ “Person of the Year: Provo Mayor John Curtis – UtahValley360”. utahvalley360.com. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  18. ^ HERALD, Genelle Pugmire DAILY. “Provo mayor No. 1 in nation for government use of social media”. Daily Herald. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  19. ^ Herald, Casey Adams Daily. “Local arts stars honored in annual SCERA gala”. Daily Herald. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  20. ^ Murray, Carolyn. “Representative John Curtis Blames Dems For Ongoing Shutdown”. www.kpcw.org. Retrieved July 18, 2019.
  21. ^ Curtis, John. “John Curtis: In Utah, being good stewards of the environment is just a part of who we are”. Daily Herald. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  22. ^ “McAdams has the highest approval rating of Utah’s House members”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved July 19, 2018.
  23. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (May 19, 2021). “Here are the 35 House Republicans who voted for the January 6 commission”. CNN. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  24. ^ John Curtis, Rob Bishop, Chris Stewart, Mia Love (December 4, 2017). “115th Congress 1st Session H. R. 4532” Archived 2018-01-17 at the Wayback Machine. naturalresources.house.gov. United States House of Representatives. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  25. ^ Vincent Schilling (January 11, 2018). “Heated Exchanges as Utah Lawmakers Push Bill for Vast Reduction of Bears Ears Monument”. Indian Country Today. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  26. ^ “Text of H.R. 6088: SPEED Act (Introduced version) – GovTrack.us”. GovTrack.us. Retrieved July 19, 2018.
  27. ^ “U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources” (PDF).
  28. ^ “Commentary: Utah’s newest congressman wants to fast-track oil drilling — putting Moab at risk”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved July 19, 2018.
  29. ^ Weaver, Jennifer (December 12, 2018). “Rep. Curtis joins Sen. Hatch in the fight against human trafficking with proposed bill”. KJZZ. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  30. ^ “Rep. John Curtis: This one act could put an end to future shutdowns”. DeseretNews.com. January 18, 2019. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  31. ^ “Rep. Curtis introduces ‘No Work, No Pay Act,’ revoking pay of reps in Washington during federal shutdowns”. fox13now.com. January 8, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  32. ^ FRANCIS, SIMONE (January 29, 2019). “Curtis pushes for transparency in student loan lending”. GOOD4UTAH. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  33. ^ “Curtis Protects Utah Priorities with New Tariff Safeguard Legislation”. Congressman Curtis. February 1, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  34. ^ Murray, Carolyn. “Representative John Curtis Says Tariffs Have Negative Impact On Utah's Small Businesses”. www.kpcw.org. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  35. ^ O’Donoghue, Amy Joi (March 12, 2019). “Trump signs massive lands bill with key Utah provisions”. DeseretNews.com. Retrieved April 23, 2019.
  36. ^ “Congress passes massive public lands bill with big impacts for Utah”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved April 23, 2019.
  37. ^ “Sen. Mitt Romney: Rural lands package reflects Utah priorities”. DeseretNews.com. February 10, 2019. Retrieved April 23, 2019.
  38. ^ “Conservation Groups Blast Sen. Hatch, Rep. Curtis on New San Rafael Swell Bill”. Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. May 9, 2018. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  39. ^ “SUWA Praises Passage of Emery County Public Land Legislation”. Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. February 12, 2019. Retrieved June 26, 2019.
  40. ^ “SUWA Praises U.S. House Vote on Emery County Public Land Legislation”. Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. February 26, 2019. Retrieved June 26, 2019.
  41. ^ “San Rafael Swell Protected by the U.S. House!”. Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. February 26, 2019. Retrieved June 26, 2019.
  42. ^ Fahys, Judy. “Environmental Groups Say Curtis’ Office Overstated Their ‘Support’ For Latest Public Lands Bill”. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  43. ^ Raymond, Art (July 10, 2019). “Effort to lift tech visa country caps, backed by Utah’s federal reps, gets nod in the House”. DeseretNews.com. Retrieved July 18, 2019.
  44. ^ “US House passes Bill removing country-cap on issuing Green Cards”. Moneycontrol. Retrieved July 18, 2019.
  45. ^ “U.S. diplomacy is critical for Utah’s economy, Rep. John Curtis says – Global Ties U.S.” www.globaltiesus.org. Retrieved April 23, 2019.
  46. ^ Geisel, Hunter (February 16, 2019). “Rep. John Curtis issues ‘Clean Air Challenge’ in Natural Resources Climate Change hearing”. KUTV. Retrieved April 23, 2019.
  47. ^ “Health (117th Congress)”. Democrats, Energy and Commerce Committee. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  48. ^ “Communications and Technology (117th Congress)”. Democrats, Energy and Commerce Committee. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  49. ^ “Environment and Climate Change (117th Congress)”. Democrats, Energy and Commerce Committee. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  50. ^ “Members”. Republican Main Street Partnership. Archived from the original on August 26, 2018. Retrieved January 24, 2018.
  51. ^ “Members”. Congressional Western Caucus. Retrieved June 27, 2018.
  52. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  53. ^ “Featured Members”. Problem Solvers Caucus. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  54. ^ Gangitano, Alex; Gangitano, Alex (November 30, 2017). “Utah’s New Congressman Comes With Baggage: 300 Pairs of Socks”. Roll Call. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  55. ^ “Rep. John Curtis, Other Provo Officials Accused Of Ignoring Complaints Against Ex-Police Chief”. Associated Press. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  56. ^ a b Piper, Matthew (April 19, 2018). “Provo responds to sexual assault allegations against former police chief”. DeseretNews.com. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  57. ^ a b Piper, Matthew (March 20, 2018). “Provo officials heard about sexual misconduct by former Chief John King years before alleged rape”. DeseretNews.com. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  58. ^ “Rep. John Curtis recounts another warning sign about former Provo police chief, says scandal ‘will leave a mark’ on re-election campaign”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  59. ^ “New lawsuit describes now-Rep. John Curtis, other Provo officials as ignoring complaints of police chief’s sexual misconduct”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  60. ^ a b Piper, Matthew (March 23, 2018). “Curtis says he heard about 3 incidents of sexual misconduct by former Provo police chief”. DeseretNews.com. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  61. ^ “Utah Election Preliminary Results”. State of Utah. Retrieved August 17, 2017.
  62. ^ “Utah Election Preliminary Results”. State of Utah. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  63. ^ “Utah Election Preliminary Results”. State of Utah. Retrieved July 12, 2018.
  64. ^ [1]

External links

Political offices
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2010–2017
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2017–present
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Burgess OwensBurgess Owens

Current Position: US Representative for UT-04 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Video:
“Absolutely Outrageous”: Burgess Owens Rips Democrats Calling Georgia Voting Law “Jim Crow”

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Summary

Current Position: US Representative for UT-04 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican

Featured Video:
“Absolutely Outrageous”: Burgess Owens Rips Democrats Calling Georgia Voting Law “Jim Crow”

About

Burgess Owens 1

Source: Government page

Burgess Owens is the Congressman from Utah’s Fourth Congressional District. Born in the segregated South, he saw people of all backgrounds come together to work tirelessly against adversity.

As a young man, Burgess was one of the first four black athletes recruited to play football at the University of Miami and the third black student there to receive a scholarship. He was the 13th pick in the first round of the 1973 NFL draft and joined the New York Jets, later playing safety for ten seasons in the NFL for the New York Jets and the Oakland Raiders, winning the Superbowl with the 1980 Raiders’ team.

After retiring from the NFL, Burgess worked in the corporate sales world and eventually moved the Owens family to beautiful Utah. Before being elected to Congress, he started Second Chance 4 Youth, a non-profit dedicated to helping troubled and incarcerated youth.

Burgess now serves as a member of the House Education and Labor Committee and House Judiciary Committee. Burgess believes in dreaming big and follows the four guiding principles of faith, family, free markets, and education.

Committees

House Education and Labor Committee 

  • Subcommittees:
    • Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education, Ranking Member
    • Subcommittee on Workforce Protections

House Judiciary Committee

  • Subcommittees:
    • Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law
    • Subcommittee on Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
    • Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security

Caucuses

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

WASHINGTON DC OFFICE
1039 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, DC  20515
Phone: (202) 225-3011

WEST JORDAN DISTRICT OFFICE
9067 S. 1300 W
Suite 101
West Jordan, UT  84088
Phone: (801) 999-9801

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Wikipedia

Twitter

Politics

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Open Secrets

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Wikipedia entry

Clarence Burgess Owens (born August 2, 1951) is an American politician, nonprofit executive and former professional football player serving as the U.S. Representative for Utah’s 4th congressional district since 2021. He played safety for 10 seasons for the New York Jets and the Oakland Raiders, winning a championship with the Raiders in Super Bowl XV in 1980. Since leaving the NFL, Owens has founded several businesses and is the CEO of a nonprofit dedicated to helping troubled and incarcerated youth. A Republican, Owens narrowly defeated incumbent Democrat Ben McAdams in the 2020 election. Owens, along with Byron Donalds, is one of two black Republicans in the House of Representatives.[2]

Early life

Owens was born in Columbus, Ohio, where his Texas-born father had come to do graduate studies he could not complete in Texas due to Jim Crow laws.[3] The family later moved to Tallahassee, Florida, where Owens’s father taught as a college professor. Owens was raised in a Baptist home.[3]

Education and football career

Owens graduated from Rickards High School in Tallahassee, Florida, in 1969.[4] He was one of four African-American players who were integrated onto a football team at a historically white high school.[5] Owens was the third of four black athletes recruited to play at the University of Miami and the third black student to earn a scholarship.[5][3] He was named a First-Team All-American defensive back, Most Valuable Defensive Player of the North–South All Star Game, and MVP of the Coaches All-American Game. He was inducted into the University of Miami Sports Hall Of Fame in 1980, and its Orange Bowl “Ring of Honor” in 1999.

Owens earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology and chemistry from the University of Miami.[6]

The New York Jets selected Owens with the 13th pick in the first round of the 1973 NFL Draft. During his rookie season, he returned a kickoff 82 yards for a touchdown against the Denver Broncos on October 28. This was the Jets’ only touchdown scored on a kickoff return during the 1970s. He was a regular starter for the Jets for most of the 1970s, and was a part of the Raiders’ 1980 Super Bowl XV championship team.

Post-football career

In 1983, Owens moved to New York City. Shortly after leaving professional football, he and his brother ran a business that sold electronics to other businesses to track business expenses. The venture failed and Owens eventually declared bankruptcy.[3]

Owens later relocated to a small apartment in Brooklyn, where he worked as a chimney sweep and security guard. He later moved to Philadelphia, where he took a sales job with WordPerfect.[3] In later years he was an account executive with Sprint and Motorola, and from 2009 to 2013 he owned a business called Pure and Simple Solutions.[7]

He is a founder, board member, and CEO of Second Chance 4 Youth, founded in 2019, a nonprofit dedicated to helping troubled and incarcerated youth.[8][9]

Owens has been a frequent guest contributor at Fox News.[10]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2020

In November 2019, Owens announced that he would run for the U.S. House of Representatives in Utah’s 4th congressional district. He was one of four candidates in the Republican primary.

On June 30, Owens won the primary with 43% of the vote, defeating Utah State Representative Kim Coleman by 20 points. He also defeated challengers KSL radio personality Jay McFarland and businessman Trent Christensen.[11][12]

Owens was a speaker at the 2020 Republican National Convention.[13]

Owens faced Democratic incumbent Ben McAdams in the general election. On November 14, eleven days after the election and with 99% of precincts reporting, President Donald Trump and Utah U.S. Senator Mike Lee congratulated Owens on winning the election, based upon Breitbart News calling it for Owens.[14] McAdams conceded to Owens on November 16[15] and the Associated Press called the race for Owens.[16]

Results

Utah’s 4th congressional district, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Burgess Owens 179,688 47.70%
DemocraticBen McAdams (incumbent)175,92346.70%
LibertarianJohn Molnar13,0533.46%
United UtahJonia Broderick8,0372.13%
Write-in290.01
Total votes376,730 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

Tenure

In late 2020, Owens was identified as a participant in the Freedom Force, a group of incoming Republican members of the House of Representatives who oppose what they consider far-left ideology in the House, specifically the progressive group called “the Squad“.[17][18][19]

On January 6, 2021, during the certification of electoral votes for the 2020 United States presidential election, Owens opposed the objection to the electors from Arizona, but supported the objection to the electors from Pennsylvania.[20][21]

In 2021, Owens opposed the For the People Act, a Democratic-sponsored bill to reform election laws.[22]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Owens has said his views were liberal upon leaving the NFL. During his 2020 Republican primary campaign, he described his current views as “very conservative.”[25] [3] In June 2019, Owens provided testimony to a United States House Committee on the Judiciary subcommittee opposing a bill that advocated reparations for slavery.[26] He has also criticized U.S. national anthem protests and Colin Kaepernick.[27] In November 2019, Owens called Donald Trump “an advocate for black Americans”.[28] On January 6, 2021, he voted to reject Pennsylvania’s electoral votes for President-elect Biden.[29]

At a June 1, 2020, Republican primary debate, Owens said Democrats in Washington are held in thrall by Marxists and socialists. He said, “The days of Ronald Reagan and Tip O’Neill are over. We’re dealing with people who hate our country”. He also said the Affordable Care Act should be repealed and that he supported President Trump.[30] Later on in the campaign, Owens changed his stance, saying that coverage for preexisting conditions should be protected, and that he did not support repeal of Obamacare.[31][32][33]

In a candidate forum in October 2020, Owens said the country’s top economic need was to reduce business regulations and make tax cuts. He also stated his opposition to a minimum wage increase.[34] When asked about the need for bipartisanship, he responded:

The first thing we have to do is make sure that the Republican Party gets control again… We’re at a point now we just cannot afford to go off the cliff and allow a socialist to actually take the lead now… We have to be honest about this. There are truly people who don’t love our culture and do anything to destroy it and transform us into something else.

Personal life

According to his website, Owens was married for 34 years and had six children before he and his wife divorced. He is a prostate cancer survivor.[35]

Owens is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and has spoken publicly about his faith.[4][36] He joined the Church during his final season with the Oakland Raiders.[5] Crediting the influence of teammate Todd Christensen, Owens (raised Baptist), and his wife Josie (raised Catholic), were baptized around 10 p.m. on December 31, 1982.[5] In 1988, he spoke at a meeting sponsored by the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies held on the 10th anniversary of the 1978 Revelation on Priesthood in the LDS Church.[37]

Works and publications

See also

References

  1. ^ Dean, Suzanne (January 13, 2021). “Congressmen representing Sanpete both vote yes on electoral objections”. Sanpete Messenger. Retrieved February 6, 2021.
  2. ^ “Black American Representatives and Senators by Congress”.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Burr, Thomas (July 6, 2020). “Meet Burgess Owens, the Utah Republican who seeks to replace Rep. Ben McAdams”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  4. ^ a b Ensley, Gerald (April 10, 2008). “Ex-NFL player with Tallahassee roots speaks Friday”. Tallahassee Democrat. Archived from the original on April 12, 2008. Retrieved April 15, 2008.
  5. ^ a b c d Toone, Trent (May 30, 2013). “Former Oakland Raider recounts LDS conversion”. Deseret News. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  6. ^ “Burgess Owens”. Young America’s Foundation. Retrieved July 27, 2020.
  7. ^ https://justfacts.votesmart.org/candidate/biography/191166/burgess-owens Vote Smart bio of Owens
  8. ^ “Burgess Owens – Sagamore Institute”. Retrieved July 27, 2020.
  9. ^ “A second look at Burgess Owens’ Second Chance 4 Youth nonprofit”. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  10. ^ “Burgess Owens appears on his way to a win over Rep. Ben McAdams in Utah’s 4th Congressional District race”. The Salt Lake Tribune.
  11. ^ Mihaly, Abigail (July 1, 2020). “Former NFL player Burgess Owens Wins Utah GOP primary”. The Hill. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  12. ^ “Former KSL radio personality Jay McFarland to run for Congress against Ben McAdams”. The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved July 11, 2020.
  13. ^ “Burgess Owens touts Trump’s record on race in speech at the Republican National Convention”. The Salt Lake Tribune.
  14. ^ Imlay, Ashley. Trump, Lee congratulate Owens on win, while race remains to be called, Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, November 14, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  15. ^ Roche, Lisa Riley (November 16, 2020). “Rep. Ben McAdams to concede race; Burgess Owens wins in 4th Congressional District”. Deseret News. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  16. ^ Whitehurst, Lindsay & Sophia Eppolito. Republican Burgess Owens unseats Utah congressman McAdams, Associated Press, November 16, 2020.
  17. ^ Jankowicz, Mia. “A group of incoming GOP House members, calling themselves the ‘Freedom Force,’ are trying to counter Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s ‘Squad. Business Insider.
  18. ^ Parke, Caleb (December 1, 2020). “GOP Congresswoman-elect on forming ‘Freedom Force’: Left is ‘totally out of line’ with mainstream”. Fox News.
  19. ^ Noor, Poppy (November 30, 2020). “The ‘Freedom Force’: Republican group takes on the Squad and ‘evil’ socialism”. The Guardian.
  20. ^ Yourish, Karen; Buchanan, Larry; Lu, Denise (January 7, 2021). “The 147 Republicans Who Voted to Overturn Election Results”. New York Times.
  21. ^ Vandenack, Tim (January 7, 2021). “Utah delegation splits on controversial objections to presidential vote totals”. Standard-Examiner.
  22. ^ Romboy, Dennis (March 10, 2021). “Sen. Mike Lee says ‘devil himself’ wrote Democrats’ election reform plan”. Deseret News. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  23. ^ “Congressman Owens Appointed to Education and Labor, House Judiciary Committees | Representative Burgess Owens”. owens.house.gov. January 25, 2021. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  24. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  25. ^ “3 GOP candidates concede 4th District primary race to Burgess Owens”. KSL.
  26. ^ Segers, Grace (June 19, 2019). “House committee confronts the “inheritance of slavery” in panel on reparations”. CBS News. Retrieved June 19, 2019.
  27. ^ “For Burgess Owens, his political journey began in an NFL locker room”. SI.com. Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  28. ^ Roche, Lisa Riley (November 6, 2019). “Former NFL player Burgess Owens gets in 4th Congressional District race”. Deseret News. Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  29. ^ Yourish, Karen; Buchanan, Larry; Lu, Denise (January 7, 2021). “The 147 Republicans Who Voted to Overturn Election Results”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  30. ^ “4th District Republicans debate economy, COVID-19 ahead of June primary election”. UtahPolicy.com. June 1, 2020.
  31. ^ “Analysis: Burgess Owens flip-flops on support for Obamacare repeal”. Salt Lake Tribune.
  32. ^ “Health care, racism divide Rep. Ben McAdams, Burgess Owens in only debate”. Deseret News. October 12, 2020.
  33. ^ “Ben McAdams and Burgess Owens Spar on Healthcare Plans In 4th Congressional District Debate”. KUER.
  34. ^ “Burgess”. The Salt Lake Tribune.
  35. ^ Conklin, Audrey (August 26, 2020). “RNC speakers: What to know about Burgess Owens”. Fox News. Retrieved August 30, 2020.
  36. ^ Raftery, Kay (June 17, 1997). “Pro Football Players Share Their Mormon Faith Ty Detmer, Burgess Owens And Vai Sikahema Told A Packed Sanctuary Of The Role Of Religion In Their Lives”. The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved February 6, 2021.
  37. ^ “LDS Afro-American Symposium”. Ensign. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. August 1988. Retrieved February 6, 2021.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Ben McAdams
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Utah’s 4th congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Jay Obernolte
United States representatives by seniority
418th
Succeeded by
August Pfluger


 

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